h1

They go up diddly-um up

April 23, 2007

dh9-2.jpg

I admit it, I was a great fan of Biggles. Not only that but I am desperately hoping my children will be as well, so that I have an excuse to get them out of storage! So I was very pleased to see THIS amazing story. I don’t remember Biggles flying the DH9, as I’m sure that he preferred the Sopwith Camel, or the occasional foray in an SE5, but I’m sure that he would have been impressed that these guys, having found the aircraft in pieces in a maharajahs elephant shed managed to reconstruct the DeHavilland DH9 bomber, a wooden aeroplane of which no other examples survive, without even the benefit of any technical drawings. I am all the more amazed because I saw pictures of the bits in a display at Duxford before they had been reconstructed and there was no wood there-only the metal parts had survived the years. It did not look like an embryo bomber, and I would have fancied my chances of matching their efforts with the contents of my shed, given enough time and effort.

Rather more worrying they apparently had enough parts left over to build another ‘plane, and this one they’re going to try to fly. I think I’ll let Algy or Bertie go up first. Not that I’m windy of course

4008sopwith-camel-1917-posters.jpg

Advertisements

2 comments

  1. […] War Museum has got the idea. They recently sold a rare Messerchmitt 163 (German)to pay for an almost unique DeHavilland DH9 (British). This sounds like a good deal especially as it looks like they may have enough parts to make 2 of […]


  2. So flying your hobby?

    The best part about world war two, was that unlike world war I where it was still only an ‘elite’ would be trained as pilots – the demand (and turnover) was so great that anyone willingto fly could become a pilot. Proving that more people could be trained as pilots – if there were no social or economic barriers

    And I dare say, we could have trained better doctors too – if we did not have the economic constraints or tuition fees – to limit those who enter the profession

    Ironically it would have been cheaper to train more doctors for free – than what it cost to give GPs a £30,000 pay rise – and ultimately are doctors going to repay their tuition fees froom what they charge the state – even those working in ‘private’ hospitals



Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: